Twenty-two pluriparous single-foetus-bearing Angora goats, housed three weeks pre-partum in mid-December, and in transition from pregnancy to lactation were used to test the efficacy of post-partum supplementation (Group S: 11 goats) or not (Group C: 11 goats) with 300g/head/day of whole field bean seeds (WFBS) to a diet based on mixed hay ad libitum and natural pasture. The goats were maintained with suckling of their kids for 90 d. Significant decreases in liveweight (LW) and body condition score (BCS), were documented post-parturition in both groups and were then maintained throughout. These suggest a mobilisation in body tissue which was not mitigated by WFBS supplementation. However, the faster growth of the suckled kids and greater elongation of mohair fibre recorded (Group S> Group C), suggested improvement in partition towards production indices of lactation and hair fibre deposition respectively. Greater concentrations of total thyroid hormones, T3 and T4 in supplemented does were recorded. Overall mean (pre-prandial) plasma insulin concentrations, not different between treatments, decreased (P<0.5) from pre-partum concentration, and showed a pattern in time, similar to that of LW and BCS. Insulin appeared not to contribute to the suggested lactational and hair growth effects and possibly contributed to transition by a homeorhetic-type reduction in concentration post-partum. Mean plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations trended lower due to supplementation from 3 weeks after kidding. It is concluded that WFBS supplementation was efficacious in improving production indices of the transition Angora goats. The feeding of different quantities of WFBS should be investigated.

Responses to dietary supplementation with field bean (Vicia faba var. minor) in production indices, mohair growth and hormonal parameters in transition Angora goats

Todini, Luca
Primo
;
Galbraith, Hugh
Secondo
;
Malfatti, Alessandro;Barbato, Olimpia;Antonini, Marco;Beghelli, Daniela
Penultimo
;
Trabalza-Marinucci, Massimo
Ultimo
2022-01-01

Abstract

Twenty-two pluriparous single-foetus-bearing Angora goats, housed three weeks pre-partum in mid-December, and in transition from pregnancy to lactation were used to test the efficacy of post-partum supplementation (Group S: 11 goats) or not (Group C: 11 goats) with 300g/head/day of whole field bean seeds (WFBS) to a diet based on mixed hay ad libitum and natural pasture. The goats were maintained with suckling of their kids for 90 d. Significant decreases in liveweight (LW) and body condition score (BCS), were documented post-parturition in both groups and were then maintained throughout. These suggest a mobilisation in body tissue which was not mitigated by WFBS supplementation. However, the faster growth of the suckled kids and greater elongation of mohair fibre recorded (Group S> Group C), suggested improvement in partition towards production indices of lactation and hair fibre deposition respectively. Greater concentrations of total thyroid hormones, T3 and T4 in supplemented does were recorded. Overall mean (pre-prandial) plasma insulin concentrations, not different between treatments, decreased (P<0.5) from pre-partum concentration, and showed a pattern in time, similar to that of LW and BCS. Insulin appeared not to contribute to the suggested lactational and hair growth effects and possibly contributed to transition by a homeorhetic-type reduction in concentration post-partum. Mean plasma insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) concentrations trended lower due to supplementation from 3 weeks after kidding. It is concluded that WFBS supplementation was efficacious in improving production indices of the transition Angora goats. The feeding of different quantities of WFBS should be investigated.
2022
262
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11581/465331
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