Simple Summary Recently, research has focused on the modulation of the gut microbiota because of its central role in several digestive physiological functions and its involvement in the onset of not only gastrointestinal but also systemic diseases. Supplementing rabbit diets with nutraceutical substances could be a strategy to prevent dysbiosis, strengthen the immune system, and reduce mortality during the critical weaning period. Bovine colostrum (BC) is a by-product of the dairy industry and is very rich in compounds with several biological activities. Its use as an intestinal microbiota modulator in rabbits has never been investigated. This study evaluates the effects of diet supplementation with two different percentages of BC (2.5 and 5%) on luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota and its metabolism-associated pathways in the jejunum, caecum, and colon of rabbits. Although our results showed no effect of BC on microbiota biodiversity, there were significant differences between experimental groups in the microbial composition, mainly at the level of sub-dominant components depending on the dose of supplementation. The metabolism-associated pathways have also been affected, and particularly interesting are the results on the amino acids and lactose metabolism. Overall, findings suggest that BC could be used as a supplement in rabbit feed, although its effects on productive and reproductive performances, intestinal disease resistance, and economic aspects need to be further evaluated. BC is a nutraceutical that can modulate intestinal microbiota. This study investigates the effects of BC diet supplementation on luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota in the jejunum, caecum, and colon of rabbits. Twenty-one New Zealand White female rabbits were divided into three experimental groups (n = 7) receiving a commercial feed (CTRL group) and the same diet supplemented with 2.5% and 5% BC (2.5% BC and 5% BC groups, respectively), from 35 (weaning) to 90 days of age (slaughtering). At slaughter, the digestive tract was removed from each animal, then both content and mucosa-associated microbiota of jejunum, caecum, and colon were collected and analysed by Next Generation 16SrRNA Gene Sequencing. Significant differences were found in the microbial composition of the three groups (i.e., beta-diversity: p < 0.01), especially in the caecum and colon of the 2.5% BC group. The relative abundance analysis showed that the families most affected by the BC administration were Clostridia UCG-014, Barnesiellaceae, and Eggerthellaceae. A trend was also found for Lachnospiraceae, Akkermansiaceae, and Bacteroidaceae. A functional prediction has revealed several altered pathways in BC groups, with particular reference to amino acids and lactose metabolism. Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio decreased in caecum luminal samples of the 2.5% BC group. These findings suggest that BC supplementation could positively affect the intestinal microbiota. However, further research is needed to establish the optimal administration dose.

Bovine Colostrum Supplementation Modulates the Intestinal Microbial Community in Rabbits

Menchetti, Laura
;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Simple Summary Recently, research has focused on the modulation of the gut microbiota because of its central role in several digestive physiological functions and its involvement in the onset of not only gastrointestinal but also systemic diseases. Supplementing rabbit diets with nutraceutical substances could be a strategy to prevent dysbiosis, strengthen the immune system, and reduce mortality during the critical weaning period. Bovine colostrum (BC) is a by-product of the dairy industry and is very rich in compounds with several biological activities. Its use as an intestinal microbiota modulator in rabbits has never been investigated. This study evaluates the effects of diet supplementation with two different percentages of BC (2.5 and 5%) on luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota and its metabolism-associated pathways in the jejunum, caecum, and colon of rabbits. Although our results showed no effect of BC on microbiota biodiversity, there were significant differences between experimental groups in the microbial composition, mainly at the level of sub-dominant components depending on the dose of supplementation. The metabolism-associated pathways have also been affected, and particularly interesting are the results on the amino acids and lactose metabolism. Overall, findings suggest that BC could be used as a supplement in rabbit feed, although its effects on productive and reproductive performances, intestinal disease resistance, and economic aspects need to be further evaluated. BC is a nutraceutical that can modulate intestinal microbiota. This study investigates the effects of BC diet supplementation on luminal and mucosa-associated microbiota in the jejunum, caecum, and colon of rabbits. Twenty-one New Zealand White female rabbits were divided into three experimental groups (n = 7) receiving a commercial feed (CTRL group) and the same diet supplemented with 2.5% and 5% BC (2.5% BC and 5% BC groups, respectively), from 35 (weaning) to 90 days of age (slaughtering). At slaughter, the digestive tract was removed from each animal, then both content and mucosa-associated microbiota of jejunum, caecum, and colon were collected and analysed by Next Generation 16SrRNA Gene Sequencing. Significant differences were found in the microbial composition of the three groups (i.e., beta-diversity: p < 0.01), especially in the caecum and colon of the 2.5% BC group. The relative abundance analysis showed that the families most affected by the BC administration were Clostridia UCG-014, Barnesiellaceae, and Eggerthellaceae. A trend was also found for Lachnospiraceae, Akkermansiaceae, and Bacteroidaceae. A functional prediction has revealed several altered pathways in BC groups, with particular reference to amino acids and lactose metabolism. Firmicutes:Bacteroidetes ratio decreased in caecum luminal samples of the 2.5% BC group. These findings suggest that BC supplementation could positively affect the intestinal microbiota. However, further research is needed to establish the optimal administration dose.
2023
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11581/470874
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