Cocaine addiction develops as a continuum from recreational to habitual and ultimately compulsive drug use. Cocaine addicts show reduced brain activity. However, it is not clear if this condition results from individual predisposing traits or is the result of chronic cocaine intake. A translational neuroimaging approach with an animal model distinguishing non-addict-like vs. addict-like animals may help overcome the limitations of clinical research by comparing controlled experimental conditions that are impossible to obtain in humans. Here we aimed to evaluate neuronal activity in freely moving rats by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the 0/3crit model of cocaine addiction. We show that addict-like rats exhibit reduced neuronal activity compared to cocaine-naïve controls during the first week of abstinence. In contrast, cocaine-experienced non-addict-like rats maintained their brain activity at a level comparable to cocaine-naïve controls. We also evaluated brain activity during cocaine bingeing, finding a general reduction of brain activity in cocaine experienced rats independent of an addiction-like phenotype. These findings indicate that brain hypoactivity in cocaine addiction is associated with the development of compulsive use rather than the amount of cocaine consumed, and may be used as a potential biomarker for addiction that clearly distinguishes non-addict-like vs addict-like cocaine use.

Cocaine addicted rats show reduced neural activity as revealed by manganese-enhanced MRI

Cannella N.;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Cocaine addiction develops as a continuum from recreational to habitual and ultimately compulsive drug use. Cocaine addicts show reduced brain activity. However, it is not clear if this condition results from individual predisposing traits or is the result of chronic cocaine intake. A translational neuroimaging approach with an animal model distinguishing non-addict-like vs. addict-like animals may help overcome the limitations of clinical research by comparing controlled experimental conditions that are impossible to obtain in humans. Here we aimed to evaluate neuronal activity in freely moving rats by manganese enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in the 0/3crit model of cocaine addiction. We show that addict-like rats exhibit reduced neuronal activity compared to cocaine-naïve controls during the first week of abstinence. In contrast, cocaine-experienced non-addict-like rats maintained their brain activity at a level comparable to cocaine-naïve controls. We also evaluated brain activity during cocaine bingeing, finding a general reduction of brain activity in cocaine experienced rats independent of an addiction-like phenotype. These findings indicate that brain hypoactivity in cocaine addiction is associated with the development of compulsive use rather than the amount of cocaine consumed, and may be used as a potential biomarker for addiction that clearly distinguishes non-addict-like vs addict-like cocaine use.
2020
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11581/447157
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