Abstract Exercise-induced changes in p66Shc-dependent signaling pathway are still not fully understood. The p66Shc protein is one of the key players in cell signaling, particularly in response to oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the phosphorylation of p66Shc as well as the induction of mitochondrial and cellular oxidative stress in rat hearts. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their hearts were removed immediately for experiments. The exercise protocol caused increased levels of the following oxidative stress parameters in cardiac cells: DNA damage, protein carbonyls, and lipid dienes. There was also increased phosphorylation of p66Shc without any alterations in Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Changes in the ferritin L levels and the L to H subunit ratio were also observed in the exercised hearts compared with the control hearts. Despite increased phosphorylation of p66Shc, no significant increase was observed in either mitochondrial H2O2 release or mitochondrial oxidative stress markers. Regardless of the changes in phosphorylation of p66Shc, the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2), and pro-apoptotic (Bax) protein levels were not affected by prolonged swimming. Further studies are required to investigate whether p66Shc phosphorylation is beneficial or detrimental to cardiac cells after exercise cessation.

Prolonged swimming promotes cellular oxidative stress and p66Shc phosphorylation, but does not induce oxidative stress in mitochondria in the rat heart

CARLONI, Manuel;GABBIANELLI, Rosita
2015-01-01

Abstract

Abstract Exercise-induced changes in p66Shc-dependent signaling pathway are still not fully understood. The p66Shc protein is one of the key players in cell signaling, particularly in response to oxidative stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of prolonged swimming on the phosphorylation of p66Shc as well as the induction of mitochondrial and cellular oxidative stress in rat hearts. Male Wistar rats were divided into a sedentary control group and an exercise group. The exercised rats swam for 3 hours and were burdened with an additional 3% of their body weight. After the cessation of exercise, their hearts were removed immediately for experiments. The exercise protocol caused increased levels of the following oxidative stress parameters in cardiac cells: DNA damage, protein carbonyls, and lipid dienes. There was also increased phosphorylation of p66Shc without any alterations in Akt and extracellular signal-regulated kinases. Changes in the ferritin L levels and the L to H subunit ratio were also observed in the exercised hearts compared with the control hearts. Despite increased phosphorylation of p66Shc, no significant increase was observed in either mitochondrial H2O2 release or mitochondrial oxidative stress markers. Regardless of the changes in phosphorylation of p66Shc, the antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase and catalase) and anti-apoptotic (Bcl2), and pro-apoptotic (Bax) protein levels were not affected by prolonged swimming. Further studies are required to investigate whether p66Shc phosphorylation is beneficial or detrimental to cardiac cells after exercise cessation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11581/362392
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