Previous studies have suggested that imidazoline I(2) receptors play a role in feeding control in rats. The effect of subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of four novel imidazoline I(2) ligands, 2-naphthalen-2yl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (benazoline), 2-styryl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole oxalate (tracizoline), o-nitro-tracizoline and o-methyl-tracizoline (metrazoline) on food intake during the light phase was now evaluated in freely feeding male Wistar rats. Their effect was compared to that of idazoxan, a high-affinity ligand at imidazoline I(2) binding sites, but also a potent alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist. Compared to idazoxan, metrazoline exhibits a higher pK(i) for imidazoline I(2) binding sites in rat liver, while the other compounds have a slightly lower pK(i); on the other hand, the novel compounds have much lower affinity than idazoxan at alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Idazoxan stimulated drinking at a dose as low as 1 mg/kg, and evoked feeding at a higher dose (30 mg/kg). The selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist 2-methoxy-idazoxan (RX821002), with negligible affinity at imidazoline I(2) binding sites, significantly increased drinking but failed to stimulate feeding at doses of 10-50 mg/kg. Metrazoline induced hyperphagia and water drinking at doses of 50 mg/kg or higher. Its dipsogenic effect was secondary to the hyperphagic effect, since it was not observed in rats without access to food. Benazoline significantly increased feeding only in response to 30 mg/kg, but its effect was less pronounced than that of metrazoline. Tracizoline and o-nitro-tracizoline were inactive. Following injection into the lateral cerebroventricle at doses up to 100 microgram/rat, and into the third or fourth brain ventricle at doses up to 50 microgram/rat, neither idazoxan nor metrazoline induced hyperphagia. The present results support the idea that imidazoline I(2) ligands influence feeding in rats, and suggest that their site of action is not in the central nervous system. The finding that idazoxan elicits a more potent hyperphagic effect than metrazoline and benazoline, although its affinity for imidazoline I(2) binding sites is lower than that of metrazoline and similar to that of benazoline, raises the question whether its hyperphagic effect might also be due to interaction with other receptors.

Hyperphagic effect of novel compounds with high affinity for imidazoline I2 binding sites

POLIDORI, Carlo;GENTILI, Francesco;PIGINI, Maria;QUAGLIA, Wilma;
2000

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that imidazoline I(2) receptors play a role in feeding control in rats. The effect of subcutaneous (s.c.) injections of four novel imidazoline I(2) ligands, 2-naphthalen-2yl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole hydrochloride (benazoline), 2-styryl-4,5-dihydro-1H-imidazole oxalate (tracizoline), o-nitro-tracizoline and o-methyl-tracizoline (metrazoline) on food intake during the light phase was now evaluated in freely feeding male Wistar rats. Their effect was compared to that of idazoxan, a high-affinity ligand at imidazoline I(2) binding sites, but also a potent alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist. Compared to idazoxan, metrazoline exhibits a higher pK(i) for imidazoline I(2) binding sites in rat liver, while the other compounds have a slightly lower pK(i); on the other hand, the novel compounds have much lower affinity than idazoxan at alpha(2)-adrenoceptors. Idazoxan stimulated drinking at a dose as low as 1 mg/kg, and evoked feeding at a higher dose (30 mg/kg). The selective alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist 2-methoxy-idazoxan (RX821002), with negligible affinity at imidazoline I(2) binding sites, significantly increased drinking but failed to stimulate feeding at doses of 10-50 mg/kg. Metrazoline induced hyperphagia and water drinking at doses of 50 mg/kg or higher. Its dipsogenic effect was secondary to the hyperphagic effect, since it was not observed in rats without access to food. Benazoline significantly increased feeding only in response to 30 mg/kg, but its effect was less pronounced than that of metrazoline. Tracizoline and o-nitro-tracizoline were inactive. Following injection into the lateral cerebroventricle at doses up to 100 microgram/rat, and into the third or fourth brain ventricle at doses up to 50 microgram/rat, neither idazoxan nor metrazoline induced hyperphagia. The present results support the idea that imidazoline I(2) ligands influence feeding in rats, and suggest that their site of action is not in the central nervous system. The finding that idazoxan elicits a more potent hyperphagic effect than metrazoline and benazoline, although its affinity for imidazoline I(2) binding sites is lower than that of metrazoline and similar to that of benazoline, raises the question whether its hyperphagic effect might also be due to interaction with other receptors.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11581/243144
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