The one-dimensional motion of a massless Brownian particle on a symmetric periodic substrate can be rectified by reinjecting its driving noise through a realistic recycling procedure. If the recycled noise is multiplicatively coupled to the substrate, the ensuing feedback system works like a passive Maxwell's daemon, capable of inducing a net current that depends on both the delay and the autocorrelation times of the noise signals. Extensive numerical simulations show that the underlying rectification mechanism is a resonant nonlinear effect: The observed currents can be optimized for an appropriate choice of the recycling parameters with immediate application to the design of nanodevices for particle transport.

Recycled noise rectification: An automated Maxwell's daemon

MARCHESONI, Fabio
2006

Abstract

The one-dimensional motion of a massless Brownian particle on a symmetric periodic substrate can be rectified by reinjecting its driving noise through a realistic recycling procedure. If the recycled noise is multiplicatively coupled to the substrate, the ensuing feedback system works like a passive Maxwell's daemon, capable of inducing a net current that depends on both the delay and the autocorrelation times of the noise signals. Extensive numerical simulations show that the underlying rectification mechanism is a resonant nonlinear effect: The observed currents can be optimized for an appropriate choice of the recycling parameters with immediate application to the design of nanodevices for particle transport.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11581/224084
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