Pathological overeating is frequently linked to an increasing incidence of obesity, one of the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Susceptible individuals might be addicted to food by losing control over the ability to regulate food intake and thus develop this eating behavior. Molecular and neurochemical evidence suggests that overconsumption of palatable foods, as with drug addiction, is accompanied by the stimulation of brain reward systems. In this Research Topic, the mechanisms engaged in food addiction-like behavior are discussed, spanning from those that involve hedonic aspects of food consumption, to those depending on storage of its energy content. The aim is to present the state of the art of the molecular clues underlying this behavior, possibly opening the avenue to next-generation therapeutics able to control excessive food intake and energy balance. Overall, our effort is to establish consensus views, and thus to highlight emerging challenges and therapeutic hopes for innovative treatments to combat food addiction-like behavior. Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.

Molecular Clues to Food Addiction-like Behavior

Carlo Cifani;
2017

Abstract

Pathological overeating is frequently linked to an increasing incidence of obesity, one of the leading cause of death in the industrialized world. Susceptible individuals might be addicted to food by losing control over the ability to regulate food intake and thus develop this eating behavior. Molecular and neurochemical evidence suggests that overconsumption of palatable foods, as with drug addiction, is accompanied by the stimulation of brain reward systems. In this Research Topic, the mechanisms engaged in food addiction-like behavior are discussed, spanning from those that involve hedonic aspects of food consumption, to those depending on storage of its energy content. The aim is to present the state of the art of the molecular clues underlying this behavior, possibly opening the avenue to next-generation therapeutics able to control excessive food intake and energy balance. Overall, our effort is to establish consensus views, and thus to highlight emerging challenges and therapeutic hopes for innovative treatments to combat food addiction-like behavior. Important Note: All contributions to this Research Topic must be within the scope of the section and journal to which they are submitted, as defined in their mission statements. Frontiers reserves the right to guide an out-of-scope manuscript to a more suitable section or journal at any stage of peer review.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11581/405371
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