Phthalates, a class of chemicals used in a whole range of industrial applications, are considered to be ubiquitous global contaminants and endocrine disruptors (EDs). These hormone-mimicking compounds bioaccumulate within organ tissues in several animals, including fishes, amphibians and mammals with different and selective patterns of distribution. The endocrine disrupting effects are probably related to the absorption of these chemicals via the alimentary canal. In particular, phthalates have been seen to be stored in the oxyntic cells of the gastric tubular glands in fishes and amphibians. A relation between bioconcentration and organ functions was also observed. Moreover, in vitro studies on rat osteoblastic cultures demonstrated that benzyl butyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate bioaccumulate, modify actin cytoarchitecture and exert mitogenic effects involving microfilament disruption and nuclear actin/lamin A regulation. On the other hand, primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts, treated with the above chemicals showed DNA base lesions with an increase of apoptotic markers induced by the p53-related pathway. These data strongly suggest that chronic exposure to phthalates could probably affect new bone formation and matrix deposition with clinical implications on bone homeostasis and mineral density. Understanding the way of action of phthalates through the study of autochthon or laboratory animals could reveal the mechanism by which these compounds, as EDs, regulate the fate of the organism.

Phthalate esters: Bioaccumulation and intracellular signal modifications in in vivo and in vitro models

MARCHETTI, Luigi;SABBIETI, Maria Giovanna;AGAS, DIMITRIOS
2012

Abstract

Phthalates, a class of chemicals used in a whole range of industrial applications, are considered to be ubiquitous global contaminants and endocrine disruptors (EDs). These hormone-mimicking compounds bioaccumulate within organ tissues in several animals, including fishes, amphibians and mammals with different and selective patterns of distribution. The endocrine disrupting effects are probably related to the absorption of these chemicals via the alimentary canal. In particular, phthalates have been seen to be stored in the oxyntic cells of the gastric tubular glands in fishes and amphibians. A relation between bioconcentration and organ functions was also observed. Moreover, in vitro studies on rat osteoblastic cultures demonstrated that benzyl butyl phthalate and di-n-butyl phthalate bioaccumulate, modify actin cytoarchitecture and exert mitogenic effects involving microfilament disruption and nuclear actin/lamin A regulation. On the other hand, primary mouse calvarial osteoblasts, treated with the above chemicals showed DNA base lesions with an increase of apoptotic markers induced by the p53-related pathway. These data strongly suggest that chronic exposure to phthalates could probably affect new bone formation and matrix deposition with clinical implications on bone homeostasis and mineral density. Understanding the way of action of phthalates through the study of autochthon or laboratory animals could reveal the mechanism by which these compounds, as EDs, regulate the fate of the organism.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11581/242039
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